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 China is determined to be despised by all!

21.07.21.  Arrogant and obnoxious scumbags is a fitting descriptor for the administrative swill that languishes in Beijing’s halls of power. Guided by the head rat Xi Jinping seems intent on friction, if not outright war. Is he so stupid and sucked up in his own importance to believe that his behaviour can continue without a backlash? Does he think, in this case, that hacking a nation’s sensitive data is ok? Well, it is not and late breaking news from the  U.S. Department of Justice has just charged four Chinese nationals with a global campaign of computer intrusion. The indictment alleges that three of the defendants were officers in a Chinese state security agency, which is an arm of China’s Ministry of State Security (MSS), according to a statement from the U.S. Justice Department. “This case is about a cyber hacking and economic espionage campaign led by the government of China,” said Randy Grossman, acting U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of California. Must see PBS News Video at bottom.

Source: Ben Packham, News Corp

China has rejected hacking claims, claiming it is a ‘victim’

China has rejected accusations by Australia, the US and 38 other nations that it is involved in state-sponsored hacking, instead seeking to portray itself as a victim of malicious cyber attacks.
In a statement, the Chinese Embassy accused Australia of “parroting” groundless US allegations that the country was behind the Microsoft Exchange hack and contracted out cyber attacks to criminals.
But it did not address the allegations in detail and failed to mention the sheer number of countries involved in the unprecedented co-ordinated pushback, which included all EU and NATO members, together with Australia, Japan, Canada and New Zealand.
A Chinese Embassy spokesman claimed the US was “the world champion of malicious cyber attacks”, and raised Australia’s attempts to tap the phone of Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, revealed in leaked 2013 documents.
“What the Australian government has done is extremely hypocritical, like a thief crying ‘stop the thief’,” the spokesman said.
“It is well known that the US has engaged in unscrupulous, massive and indiscriminate eavesdropping on many countries including its allies.
“Australia also has a poor record, including monitoring the mobile phone of the president of its biggest neighbour country, not to mention acting as an accomplice for the US’ eavesdropping activities under the framework of Five Eyes alliance.
“As a victim of cyber attacks, China always firmly opposes cyber attacks and cyber theft in all forms, and calls on countries to advance dialogue and co-operation to safeguard cyber security.”
Home Affairs Minister Karen Andrews said Australia had no doubt that the Chinese Ministry of State Security was behind the attack on Microsoft’s Exchange mail server in January, which cost billions in stolen intellectual property, ransom payments and security measures.
“Many of our partner nations have worked together to make sure that we have very high levels of confidence that this was the Chinese Ministry of State Security that was behind this attack,” Ms Andrews told a press conference on Tuesday morning.
She acknowledged there were likely to be “serious implications” for publicly identifying China, but said she would not hesitate to hold the country accountable if it continued to launch cyber attacks.
On Monday night, in a co-ordinated action with allies, the government took the rare step of attributing the Microsoft Exchange attack to China, and accused Beijing of engaging “contract hackers” to steal intellectual property.
In a statement on Monday night, the government said it joined international partners in “expressing serious concerns about malicious cyber activities by China’s Ministry of State Security”.
“The Australian government is also seriously concerned about reports from our international partners that China’s Ministry of State Security is engaging contract hackers who have carried out cyber-enabled intellectual property theft for personal gain and to provide commercial advantage to the Chinese government,” it said.
In a statement on Monday night, the government said it joined international partners in “expressing serious concerns about malicious cyber activities by China’s Ministry of State Security”.
“The Australian government is also seriously concerned about reports from our international partners that China’s Ministry of State Security is engaging contract hackers who have carried out cyber-enabled intellectual property theft for personal gain and to provide commercial advantage to the Chinese government,” it said.
“Australia calls on all countries — including China — to act responsibly in cyberspace,” the statement said.
“China must adhere to the commitments it has made in the G20, and bilaterally, to refrain from cyber-enabled theft of intellectual property, trade secrets and confidential business information with the intent of obtaining competitive advantage.”
Australia has since 2017 named China, North Korea, Russia and Iran as malicious cyber actors, but does so infrequently.
Most recently, it joined more than 30 international partners to hold Russia to account for its cyber attacks against SolarWinds.
The latest disclosure comes amid a new operation by the Australian Federal Police to strike back against ransomware attackers in Australia and Russia, in response to a spate of major ­attacks on Australian businesses, hospitals and government.
Operation Orcus is Australia’s strongest response yet to the surging incidence of this form of cyber crime, both here and overseas where online criminals steal sensitive data and demand multimillion-dollar ransoms for its return.
Australia has experienced a 60 per cent increase in ransomware ­attacks over the past year that are estimated to have cost the economy $1.4bn while temporarily paralysing hospitals as well as large and small businesses across the nation.
Australia’s move to form a multi-agency task force follows a similar initiative this week by Joe Biden in response to a string of attacks by suspected Russia-based criminals on a major oil pipeline and on the world’s largest meat processing company, JBS.
More than 459 Australian entities were hit by ransomware ­attacks in the year to April 2020 compared with at least 291 in the previous 12 months.

Video source: PBS News Hour

 

{ 1 comment… add one }
  • Steve 21/07/2021, 6:04 am

    Lake China has a nice ring to it.

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